All Around the Liberal Arts

By Clara McConnell, Matthew Stone

MIT
Students pull anniversary hack

In a unique way of commemorating the attacks of Sept. 11, students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) placed a life-size, fake fire truck on the top of the school’s Great Dome on Monday morning.

The Great Dome, a 150-foot high rotunda on the college campus, has been the sight of such pranks since the 1960s. Many objects have graced the dome over the years, including what appeared to be an actual MIT police cruiser and a replica of the Wright Brothers’ biplane.

The vehicle atop the dome this time appeared to be the cab of an antique fire truck attached to a rectangular box with the words “MIT Fire Department” painted on the side.

Dartmouth College
Outing Club skills put to good use

Many Dartmouth Outing Club participants found themselves “roughing it” at the beginning of the semester as they returned from camping trips only to be moved into the Field House, as several dorms were not ready for occupancy.

Three of the new dorms on the campus that were scheduled to have occupancy permits on Sept. 6 did not receive the permits until Sept. 11, meaning many students could not move into their rooms. They only had to spend one night in the Field House before being relocated to alternate dorms.

Harvard University
University eliminates early admissions policy

Harvard University made news this week when it announced that it would eliminate its early action admissions system for applicants from the class of 2012.

In changing the system, Harvard said that early admissions programs can serve as barriers to low-income students who must, before enrolling in a college, weigh financial aid offers from multiple schools. Harvard will pilot the change for two to three years.

The Boston Globe reported Tuesday that Harvard officials were hoping to trigger a trend across academia. The University of Delaware eliminated its early decision option earlier this year, but many say that Harvard’s decision, given the college’s stature, could provide a greater impetus for widespread change.

The jury, however, is still out on whether other colleges will follow suit.

“It really would have to start at the top,” Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid Lorne Robinson said. “I still wonder whether this will be a movement or not.”

Macalester, which admitted 128 of 501 current first-year students under its early decision system, is unlikely to be the next school to take the plunge.

“[Harvard is] a very different world than here at Macalester,” Robinson said.