Student committee to advise Institute

By Angela Whited

The Institute for Global Citizenship’s Student Advisory Committee held its first meeting this Monday to discuss students’ role in shaping the newly created Institute.

Co-chaired by Associate Dean of the Institute Karin Trail-Johnson and Dean of Multicultural Life Tommy Lee Woon, the committee consists of 11 students from a variety of student organizations.

According to Trail-Johnson, plans for the formation of the Student Advisory Committee have been in the works since the initial proposal was drafted for the launch of the Institute last year.
The student committee will work in conjunction with a Global Advisory Committee comprising professionals from local, national, and international spheres who have made significant contributions to global citizenship, as well as the Campus Advisory Committee, which includes of faculty, staff, and two student members.

Trail-Johnson explained her view of the Institute for Global Citizenship as having three parts: existing programs, emerging programs and brand new programs. She described the Institute as a skeleton that needed filling in with the help of student input and ideas generated by the committee.

Woon explained that he and Trail-Johnson are only helping to form the group. He added that by the end of the year they expect the committee to be student-governed, with the members selecting their own successors.

Woon also said that he and American Studies Chair Jane Rhodes will be meeting with Dean Ahmed Samatar soon and are working closely with the Campus Advisory Committee to ensure that the Institute is an inclusive organization.

Samatar and Associate Dean Andrew Latham were not present at Monday’s meeting, but are scheduled to attend the next committee’s meeting on Nov. 20. Students voiced some initial concern over the fact that the two would not regularly attend meetings.

One of the first tasks of the committee is to spread word of the 100 Projects for Peace initiative that is open to all Macalester students and groups of students in good academic standing.

“I think one of the best things about working at Mac is seeing the things students come up with,” Trail-Johnson said. “I can’t wait to see the good ideas that come out of this. When we brought the one practical thing [to the table] you could see the energy happening.”